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HistoryVP-26 HistoryHistory

Circa 1948

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: UNIT: VP-26 PREVIOUS DES: VP-HL-6 NAME: Tridents TAIL CODE: HA/LR ACTIVATED: 9-8-48 DEACTIVATED: TYPICAL LOCATION(S): NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii
Books"Title: Lockheed P2V Neptune An Illustrated History by Wayne Mutza wmutza@wi.rr.com...A Schiffer Military History Book...ISBN: 0-7643-0151-9...286 pages full of pictures and history!


Circa 1946

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13) - Circa 1946. Squadrons Mentioned: VP-21 and VPB-26..." WebSite: USS Salisbury Sound http://www.salisburysound.com/index_Page555.htm [07JAN2007]

Salisbury Sound got underway from San Pedro on 27 December 1945 for training out of San Diego. She cleared port on 12 February 1946 and arrived at Pearl Harbor on the 20th. After final exercises in the Hawaiian area, she sailed on 1 March to load 6 fighter planes and a torpedo bomber at Guam (13-15 March), then reported for duty to Commander Air Wing One at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 19 March 1946. After conducting familiarization flights and gunnery tracking drills for planes of VP-21, she got underway on 8 June for tender service of VPB-26 at Shanghai (11 June-5 July); Tsingtao (6-17 July), returning to Buckner Bay on 10 July to resume duties at that base. She again sailed on 13 September to tend planes of Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Six at Tsingtao, returning to 6 October 1946. Having repaired some 26 planes and directed several air-sea search and rescue missions which saved the life of a number of men, she put to sea on 4 November 1946 for return to the United States. Steaming by the way of the Philippines ports of Puerto Princessa, Manila and Guiuan, she arrived at San Diego on 23 December 1946. After upkeep and local training exercises, she cleared San Diego on 29 March 1947 again bound for Buckner Bay, Okinawa. She arrived at the latter base on 18 April 1947 to commence a second tour of duty as a mobile repair and seadrome control unit for the maintenance of patrol planes at that port, Tsingtao, China and Apra Harbor, Guam. She departed Buckner Bay on 27 July for another stay of service at Tsingtao until 30 August, then loaded planes and aviation cargo at Manila for delivery to Apra Harbor on 9 September 1947. She then set course for return to San Diego, 22 September 1947.

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...20FEB46 - While on a training flight, a US Navy PBM-5 from VP-26, based in Tsingtao China, made an unauthorized flight over Dairen (Port Arthur) Manchuria. As a result, Soviet fighters fired warning bursts at it, but no damage was inflicted..." Website: Aircraft Downed During the Cold War and Thereafter http://www.silent-warriors.com/shootdown_list.html [20FEB2003]


Circa 1945

HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - November 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - October 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - September 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - August 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - July 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - June 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - April 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - March 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - February 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - January 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...From 1945 to 1969, U.S. Navy aircraft were involved in a number of aerial incidents with forces of the Soviet Union, People's Republic of China, North Korea, and Czechoslovakia. These incidents resulted in the loss of eight Navy aircraft and one Coast Guard aircraft, eighty-one Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard aviators and crewman, and several aircraft damaged and crewmen wounded and injured. The list below, compiled from official and unofficial sources, does not include aircraft lost in direct action in the Korean and Vietnam wars, nor aircraft shot down by Chinese forces in the vicinity of Vietnam in connection with that war..." Naval Historical Center, Department Of The Navy, Washington, D. C http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/dictvol2.htm [06MAY2001]

  • 15 Nov 1945 PBM-5
    While on a routine patrol mission, this aircraft was attacked by a Soviet fighter 25 miles south of Dairen (Port Arthur), Manchuria while investigating six Soviet transport ships and a beached seaplane in the Gulf of Chihli in the Yellow Sea. No damage inflicted.

  • 20 Feb 1946 PBM-5 VP-26
    Based from Tsingtao, China, during a training flight this aircraft made an unauthorized flight over Dairen (Port Arthur), Manchuria. As a result, it was fired upon by Soviet fighters firing warning bursts for twenty minutes. No damage inflicted.

  • 8 Apr 1950 PB4Y-2 VP-26
    Based from NAF Port Lyautey, Morocco, while on a Det A patrol mission launched from Wiesbaden, West Germany, this aircraft (BuNo 59645) was lost when attacked by Soviet aircraft over the Baltic Sea off the coast of Lepija, Latvia. Wreckage was recovered, but unconfirmed reports stated that the missing ten crewmembers were taken prisoner.

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Air-to-Air Shoot Downs by Navy and Marine Corps Patrol Type Aircraft During World War II - This Squadron Mentioned...Naval Historical Center ADOBE Download File: http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-vol2/Appen4.pdf [12FEB2004]
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    Open VP History Adobe FileAir-To-Air Shootdowns 118KB


    Circa 1944 - 1949

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraPB4Y-2 Squadron Assignments "...PB4Y-2 Squadron Assignments 1944 - 1949 by W. T. Larkins 5-11-1984. A review of the aircraft history cards for the 740 aircraft 59350-60009 and 66245-66324 allows the following squadrons with one or more aircraft. Unfortunately the original assignment on many in 1944 is simply "PAC" for Pacific area. No card was found to verify VB-200 as the first squadron delivery or any Marine Corps squadrons. Squadrons listed include VP-12, VP-21, VP-22, VP-23, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, VP-28, VP-29, VPB-100, VPB-101, VPB-10, VPB-102, VPB-104, VPB-106, VPB-107, VPB-108, VPB-109, VPB-111, VPB-114, VPB-115, VPB-116, VPB-117, VPB-118, VPB-119, VPB-120, VPB-121, VPB-122, VPB-123, VPB-124, VPB-143, VPB-197, VPB-200, VP-HL-1, VP-HL-2, VP-HL-4, VP-HL-6, VP-HL-7, VP-HL-8, VP-HL-9, VP-HL-10, VP-HL-11, VP-HL-12, VP-HL-13, VPM-1, VPW-1, VPW-2, VPW-3, VX-1 and VX-2..." Contributed by Bill Larkins wtl@earthlink.net [01AUG2010]


    Circa 1944 - 1946

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "Dictionary of American Naval Aviation Squadrons CD-ROM: Dictionary of American Naval Aviation Squadrons Vol. 2 Stock No. 008-046-00195-2 The History of VP, VPB, VP(HL), and VP(AM) Naval Historical Center, Department Of The Navy, Washington, D. C...." [15JUN2000]
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    Open VP History Adobe FileCHAPTER 3 Patrol Squadron (VP) Histories VP-26 553B


    Circa 1944

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - December 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - November 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX (VPB-26) - War Diary - October 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Documention [25OCT2013]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FAW-5 - VP-26 War Diary - June 1944 - War Diary..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [04NOV2012]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...FAW-5 - VP-26 War Diary - May 1944 - War Diary..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [04NOV2012]

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    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraFAW-2 VP Aircraft and Location "...FAW-2, VPB-4, VPB-13, VPB-19, VPB-25, VPB-26, VPB-28, VPB-71, VPB-100, VPB-111 and VPB-115 - FAW-2/A12-1 01 NOVEMBER to 30 NOVEMBER 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [16OCT2012]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: History ThumbnailCameraFAW-2 VP Aircraft and Location "...FAW-2, VPB-4, VPB-11, VPB-13, VPB-16, VPB-26, VPB-27, VPB-28, VPB-34, VPB-52, VPB-100 and VPB-106 - FAW-2/A12-1-013 December to 31 December 1944..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [15OCT2012]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Rehoboth Seaplane Tender - A city on Delaware's Atlantic Coast. The first Rehoboth retained her former name...(Squadrons Mentioned: FAW-7, VH-1, VH-6, VPB-20, VPB-26 and ZP-14)..." WebSite: Naval History Center http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/r4/rehoboth-ii.htm [23DEC2005]

    Rehoboth

    A city on Delaware's Atlantic Coast. The first Rehoboth retained her former name.

    II

    (AVP - 50: displacement 2,800 (full load); length 310'9"; beam 41'2"; draft 13'6"; speed 18 knots; complement 215; troop 152; armament 2 5", 8 40mm., 8 20mm., 2 depth charge tracks; class Barnegat)

    The second Rehoboth (AVP-50) was laid down 3 August 1942 by Lake Washington Shipyards, Houghton, Wash.; launched 8 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. R. P. McConnell; and commissioned 23 February 1944, Comdr. Robert Crawford Warrack in command.

    Following shakedown off San Diego, Rehoboth transited the Panama Canal 25 April 1944 and reached Norfolk 14 May. Three days later she sailed for Casablanca carrying men and cargo of ZP-14. Returning to Norfolk 9 June, she carried cargo and personnel for FAW-7 in Britain, 8 July to 9 August, then sailed south to Recife reporting to ComFAirWing 16 for duty 31 August. She transported passengers and cargo between various Brazilian ports until 15 January 1945 when she departed Natal for Bristol, England, carrying personnel and cargo for ComFAirWing 7. On 14 February she returned to Norfolk, whence, until mid-June, she carried men and equipment to Bristol and Avonmouth in England.

    Rehoboth retransited the Panama Canal 18 August, and after calls at San Diego and Pearl Harbor she arrived off Okinawa 2 October. There for 2 weeks she tended planes of air-sea rescue squadron 6 (VH-6), then steamed to Jinsen, Korea, where she took command of a seadrome, and tended planes of VPB-20. In mid-November she crossed the Yellow Sea, and from 18 November-21 December tended a detachment of VH-6. On Christmas Day she arrived at Shanghai to tend VH-1 and VPB-26 planes. On 25 January Rehoboth got underway for Nagoya, Japan, thence proceeded to Kobe 17 February where she set up an auxiliary seadrome area. On 24 March she arrived at Sasebo where she assumed seadrome control.

    Rehoboth continued to serve in Japanese waters until August when she returned briefly to the Chinese coast, then operated off Australia and in the Philippines. In November she returned to Japan whence she sailed east in 1947. Arriving at San Diego 18 March, she continued on, transited the Panama Canal at the end of the month, and reached Philadelphia, 9 April. Decommissioned 30 June 1947, she commenced conversion to a survey ship the following year.

    Reclassified AGS-50, she recommissioned 2 September 1948, and commenced oceanographic survey work under the direction of the Hydrographic Office. Equipped with a small laboratory and machinery to take Nansen casts, which provide the oceanographer with the temperature and samples of sea water at different depths, and drill for core samples, she traveled over 300,000 miles in the North Atlantic and adjacent seas during her first 6 years of operation.

    In February 1952, while crossing the Atlantic, she discovered and accurately positioned an underwater mountain range with heights up to 12,000 feet above the ocean floor. In March 1952 she discovered and charted a 7,000-foot mountain near Bermuda and in August 1953 Rehoboth became the first ship to anchor in over 2 miles of water.

    Employed on special projects in 1953 and 1954, she returned to oceanographic survey work in the Atlantic and Caribbean in 1953. Transferred to the Pacific in 1956, she departed Philadelphia 15 February. Transiting the Panama Canal 22 February, she was diverted to an area northwest of the Galapagos Islands to search for the raft "Cantuta" which she found after 4 days. On 9 March Rehoboth reached San Francisco, and for the next year operated off the west coast. On 4 March 1957 she proceeded to Pearl Harbor for 3 months work in Hawaiian waters. For the next 9 months she operated in the eastern Pacific. In April 1958 she extended her range to the Marshalls and in 1960 to the western Pacific. In October 1960 she also added operations off the South American coast. For the next 4 years her missions spanned the Pacific from equatorial to arctic climes.

    In September 1965 Rehoboth completed operations in the northern Pacific and in November commenced survey operations in the South China Sea, conducting in December a hydrographic survey of the South Vietnamese coast from the Mekong Delta to Cape Padaran.

    After completing survey operations in the South China Sea in February 1966, she sailed east, arriving at San Francisco 23 March. Overhaul and west coast operations followed. In 1967 she conducted operations in the northern and western Pacific. In California waters from December 1967 until 14 March 1968, she then departed San Francisco for Yokosuka. She undertook survey operations in the Philippine Sea until August, returning to San Francisco 26 September where she remained for the balance of the year. She operated off the California coast in early 1969 until deploying to the Far East in August, returning in December to San Francisco. She decommissioned and was struck from the Navy list 15 April 1970.

    23 September 2005

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...I'm writing to you on behalf of my father. He wrote to you about some history of VPB-26. My father never really said much until recently about the war. I began asking him a lot about it after I met a Mr. John Martocci, whom my father flew with. John told me a couple of things and I stumbled upon one of my father's old flight logs. My dad was referred to as Tex Emerson and was in combat aircrew eight. There are a couple of stories I've sent that refer to him. I did see in one of his flight logs an entry that took place sometime in 1945 about a night they "got the hell shot out of them." VPB-26 apparently dates back farther than naval records indicate. Having served in the navy myself I know sometimes records don't always show historical fact. My dad sent me a "memory" book from VPB-26..."

    VPB 26
    Our Squradron History


    FIRST PUBLISHED IN THE "MARINER" ABOARD THE USS NORTON SOUND (AVII) IN AUGUST, 1945.

    Patrol Bombing Squadron 26 was commissioned 1 May, 1944 at Norfolk with Lt. Cdr. R.S. Null as commanding officer and Lt. Cdr. D.C. Coy as executive officer. Attached to Fleet Air Wing FIVE, "It commenced an intensive three and a half months of shakedown at Charleston, S.C. prior to Joining the Pacific Fleet.

    On 3 September, the planes with skeleton crews proceeded on a transcontinental flight to Alameda, Calif. No mishaps occurred other than CAC l's forced landing in Monterey Bay due to a serious leak in one engine.

    On 15 September, ground and excess flight personnel departed from San Francisco on the USS THETIS BAY for Oahu, T.H. Departure of crews and planes for Kaneohe commenced on 28 September. Upon arrival all planes of the Squadron were assigned to Fleet Air Wing TWO for further ground and flight training...air bombers were given an extensive course ABTU; survival lectures were given at the Bishop Museum at Honolulu; CAC's attended Gunnery school; radiomen received additional training in the use of special equipment and flight training included bombing practice, searches and patrol, simulated mine laying, fighter evasion tactics and night patrols. All crews experienced tender operations with either the USS BERING STRAIT or the USS CUMBERLAND SOUND at Hilo, Hawaii.

    During November, new black PBM-5's replaced our PBM3-D's and CAC's 8,10,11 and 16, ferried some of the older planes to the forward area.

    Beginning 25 January, 1945, the Squadron departed Kaneohe for Parry Island, Eniwetok, in the Marshalls-Gilberts. For nearly two months the Squadron conducted convoy coverage, searches, reconnaissance and "Dumbo" flights to the Jap-held islands of Wake and Ponape, and special missions such as the search for the B-24 lost between KwaJalein and Johnston Is. which was carrying Lt. Gen. Harmon back to Washington.

    While at Eniwetok, Lt. Cutet with CAC#2 and Lt(Jg) Cornish with CAC#12 were detached from the Squadron on temporary duty to participate in the invasion of Iwo Jima. These two crews performed "dumbo" missions'for B-29's and B-24's north of Saipan. Lt Cutet, on 11 February spotted seven survivors of a B-29, dropped supplies and directed surface craft to the life rafts. These crews performed the first "Aerial Press Service" in the war by flying mail and photographic material from Iwo during the invasion and dropping them at NAS Agana, Guam to be returned immediately to the States.

    On 24 March, the Squadron moved to Tanapag Harbor, Saipan, where it conducted search and night anti-submarine patrol flights until 27 April when it proceeded forward to Kerama Retto in the Ryukyus. On 19 April, the Squadron became tender-based and ground and excess flight personnel left Saipan aboard the tender while the planes flew to Kerama a week later.

    Up to 7 June the Squadron conducted anti-submarine patrols and from 7 June to 1 July, Participated in anti-shipping sweeps and searches within sight of Formosa, China, Korea and Japan. The period of search patrols left no doubt the VPB-26 was a fighting squadron composed of as aggressive pilots and aircrevmen as any PBM squadron in the Pacific Fleet. These pilots and men were not only able and willing to go out and accomplish things, but were able to return safely. The following crews were responsible for a great amount of punishment inflicted upon the enemy;-CAC's 7, 11, 15, 8, 12, 17, 16, 13, 2 and 1. The following pilots lead these crevs;-Lt. Cdr. Coy, Lt. Turner, Lt. Bach, Lt. Clews, Lt(jg) Cornish, Lt. Walker, Lt-. Hoffman, Lt(Jg) Cieslinski, Lt. Cutet and Lt(jg) Whitman.

    The Squadron has set a record for every officer and man to be proud of and one for relief crews to attempt to emulate.

    Some of our crews are leaving the area for a well deserved period of rest back home and others will be following very shortly. Let's hope that all of you who may return to duty In the Pacific may find a berth as pleasant as the one in "26."

    VPB-26
    SQUADRONIS FINAL SCORE


    The cover on this veek's "Mariner" is the squadron's "Mission Board." It represents, for the most part, damage Inflicted upon the enemy within a period of three weeks of search operations.

    The total assessment was; sixteen ships sunk, thirty-one ships damaged, two shipyards destroyed, one plane destroyed and three radio stations damaged. In addition to the above, four survivors were rescued by the pilots of the squadron, one within less than a mile of enemy shore batteries that fired upon the plane.

    The squadron feels that it has reason to be proud of the above record, Particularly since it did not suffer a single casualty or loss of aircraft.

    Credit is also due to the excellent work of the maintenance crews of the Air Department. Without their cooperation and constant labor'in keeping the planes in commission,, the squadron would not have built up the enviable it has. To them, the "Unsung Heroes," the pilots express their thanks.

    In bidding us farewell on leaving for their new assignment, the Squadron expresses the wish that the Norton Sound were going with them.



    Source: "Crews News,," USS Cumberland Sound AV-17, Sept. 15, 1945.
    VPB-26 OKINAWA VETERANS NOW ABOARD AV-17
    HAVE IMPRESSIVE RECORD


    As the climax of an outstanding record, Patrol Bombing Squadron 26, flying Mariner flying boats, has. become the first seaplane squadron to land in Japanese home waters, where it will operate in connection with the occupation forces, on the afternoon of August 30th, Tokyo time, the Ist planes of the squadron, led by the squadron skipper, Lt. Cdr. R.S. Null, USNR, of Rushon, La., landed in Tokyo Bay.

    Two days earlier, the USS Cumberland Sound, the Seaplane Tender to which the squadron Is attached, had arrived in Tokyo Bay with the first group of ships of the occupation forces. Some of the crews not making the trip by plane, together with administrative and ground personnel of the squadron, were aboard the tender.

    The honor of being the first seaplane squadron to arrive in Tokyo Bay is well merited by VPB-26, which has achieved an impressive history. The squadron was commissioned May 1, 1944 and after operating successively in the Hawaiian area, Eniwetok, KwaJalein and Saipan, It was ordered to Kerama Retto, Okinawa Gunto, in April 1945.

    At Okinawa, the squadron executed a wide variety of missions, reaching to the China Coast near Formosa and up to the tip of the Shantung Peninsula, along the shores of Korea, into the Japan Sea and along the eastern shores of Japan as far north as Honshu.

    It's record shows 19 Japanese merchant ships sunk, 31 damaged, 1 Jap fighter shot down and 2 others damaged, 2 Japanese shipyards destroyed, several docks and piers damaged and several lighthouses, radio stations and weather stations bombed and strafed.

    A great variety of Japanese shipping was encountered and attacked off the shores of China and Korea. Valuable information as to the movement of Japanese warships from China and Korea to Japan was obtained on the long range searches.

    Dick Warner (CAC11) sent the above story which was printed In Crews News aboard the Cumberland Sound AV-17 after they had entered Tokyo Bay. Dick was with the squadron from Its inception at Norfolk, May 1944, until he returned home in November, 1945. He has a good collection of squadron related photos and a squadron insignia which was sewn on his flight Jacket, along with the Chinese flag which was sewn in the lining. our thanks to Dick for his contribution to our squadron history.



    UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET
    PATROL BOMBING SQUADRON TWENTY SIX
    Important Dates In Our Squadron History


    May 1, 1944 Squadron VP-26 commissioned, NAS Norfolk, VA.

    Oct 1, 1944 Squadron designation changed to VPB-26.

    May 15, 1946 Designation changed back to VP-26.

    Dec 14,1946 Squadron decommissioned.

    May 1944 Squadron formed at NAS Norfolk and were assigned 15 PBM-3D Mariners & 16 Combat Air Crews.

    May 11, 1944 Squadron started moving to NAS Charleston, SC.

    Sept 2, 1944 Started trans-continental flight to NAS Alameda,CA.

    Nov 2, 1944 First planes arrived NAS Kaneohe, Hawaii.

    Nov 1944 Squadron received all new PBM-5D planes. Color black.

    Jan 25, 1945 Planes started departing Kaneohe for Eniwetok, with a stop at Johnston Island and a brief stay at Kwajalein.

    Jan 28, 1945 Squadron based ashore at Parry Island, Eniwetok Atoll.

    Jan 30, 1945 Planes started departing Parry Island, Eniwetok, for Saipan. Two planes flew from Saipan to participate in the Iwo Jima invasion.

    March 21, 1945 Squadron based ashore at NAB Tanapag Harbor, Saipan.

    March 24, 1945 Started search and night Anti-Sub Patrols from Saipan.While at Saipan, Squadron boarded the USS Norton Sound, (AV-11), the newest of Seaplane Tenders.

    April 26, 1945 Norton Sound arrived at Kerama Retto.

    April 27, 1945 First planes started arriving at Kerama Retto.

    May 28,1945 Squadron missions were changed from anti-sub to sector searches and anti-shipping missions. Flights were along the coasts of China, Korea and Japan.

    June, 1945 Total damage for three weeks operation were: 16 ships sunk, 31 ships damaged, 1 plane destroyed, 2 planes damaged, 2 shipyards destroyed, 2 docks destroyed and 3 radio stations-damaged.

    July 15, 1945 Due to enormous swells at Kerama Retto, squadron and the Norton Sound moved to Chima Wan, Okinawa.

    July 31, 1945 CAC's 7 & 13 were replaced by relief crews and detached. Aug 5, 1945 CAC's 3, 4 & 17 were detached and headed home. Squadron continued Anti-Sub Patrols.

    Aug 15, 1945 At 0800 word received that President Truman had announced the war was over. The Norton Sound made an evening departure for Tokyo Bay.

    Aug 16, 1945 Orders were changed, Norton Sound returned to Okinawa.

    Aug 17, 1945 Four flight crews aboard the Cumberland Sound (AV-17) and headed once again for Tokyo Bay. During period of readiness for flights to Tokyo, CAC's 10, 12 & 8 were detached and departed for home.

    Aug 28, 1945 Cumberland Sound arrived at Tokyo Bay.

    Aug 30, 1945 VPB-26 planes led by our skipper Lt Cdr Null landed in Tokyo Bay. They were the first planes to land there. A distinct honor for VPB-26.

    Oct 1, 1945 Change of command for VPB-26. Lt Cdr Campbell new skipper.

    Oct 14, 1945 The remaining "original" crews of VPB-26 were detached. This completed 17 months of duty with no serious injury or death to personnel, or loss of aircraft due to enemy action.

    THANKS FOR THE HELP


    The many personal experiences and stories of the personnel of US Navy-Patrol Bombing Squadron Twenty-Six would have been lost forever had it not been for the cooperation of its members and those associated with them. This "Memories Book" represents the writings of our personnel which we have accumulated since the Chicago reunion in 1988. In addition there are bits of our history, original rosters and short stories that are part of the VPB-26 History.

    Our thanks to all for their help. Without your cooperation, this book would not have been possible. Harold Radugge and Harold Radugge Jr. designed and provided the covers for each book printed. And then there are the artists,Peter and Mary Ann Glover and Rick Brodeur fox the sketches of various Squadron incidents throughout our tour. Contributions from young artists Patrick Brodeur and Christopher Young helped to illustrate a couple of events we heard so much about. The Brodeur Group of Boscawen, NH have offered the services of their facilities and staff for any VPB-26 projects since we took over the publication of the newsletters in 188, courtesy: Ed & Sandra Brodeur. We are grateful for everyones cooperation and help.

    The "Memories Book" was printed by Town Country Graphics, Concord, NH, (the same printers who prepare our newsletters.) They were handed a folder full of paste-ups, typed pages and loose photos. They managed to put together the "Memories Book" which you have before you. we appreciate their assistance and interest in our VPB-26 publications.

    I am hopeful that this accumulation of the bits & pieces that made Patrol Bombing Squadron 26 the unique flying boat squadron that it was, will preserve our history of WWII for generations to come.

    Our many thanks to all who in any way helped to make this book possible.

    Sincerely
    Dick Brodeur
    Newsletter Editor
    52 Center Street
    Penacook, New Hampshire
    03303-1640
    Contributed by R. Bruce Emerson, Active duty 1976 to 1986 emersonr@inreach.com [12JAN99]

    Circa 1943

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...The squadron's history may be traced back to August 26, 1943. When Bombing Squadron 114, flying the PB4Y Liberator from the NAF Lajes, Azores, Portugal, was asked with Convoy protection duty in the Atlantic during WW II. On 1 October 1944 was designated VPB-114, and on 15 November 1946 VP-HL-6 with HB as tail code on its PB4Y-2 Privateers. Successively the squadron adopted the code EK and in 1947 was based in NAF Port Lyautey, Morocco, with temporary detachments at Hal Far, Malta. On 15 September 1948 the squadron was designated VP-26. One of its PB4Y-2 was shot down in the Baltic Sea by Soviet fighters in 1950. In 1951 the squadrton received the P2V-3 Neptune and subsequently moved from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland to NAS Brunswick, Maine. in 1953 the code was EB. In 1958 the VP-26 passed to the P2V-5, with code LK. Some of the highlights..." Contributed by Claudio Antonelli clantos@tin.it [24DEC2000]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron 26, a member of Patrol Wing FIVE, is a Maritime Patrol Squadron with a world wide theater of operations. Mission areas include: anti-submarine warfare; anti-ship warfare; offensive and defensive mine delivery; sea surveillance and maritime intelligence collection; coastal and overland reconnaissance; targeting for strikes; counterdrug detection and monitoring; electronic warfare; battle damage assessment; and search and rescue. Although the "TRIDENTS" are homeported at U.S. Naval Air Station, Brunswick, Maine, their reputation is known throughout the world. As a result of the squadron's versatility and mobility, the men and women of VP-26 have made friends everywhere they have traveled. The Squadron's history may be traced back to August 26, 1943 when Bombing Squadron 114, flying the PB4Y Liberator, was tasked with convoy protection duty during World War 11. In 1948, the designation was changed to Patrol Squadron 26 and the squadron was based in NAS Port Lyautey, French Morocco until 1950. In 1951 the squadron received its second type of ascot, the P-2V Neptune, and subsequently moved from Patuxent River, Maryland to Brunswick, Maine. Some of the highlights in the 1960's include support of the Quarantine during the Cuban Missile Crisis, transition to the P-3 Orion in 1966, and operations in Southeast Asia where several members earned Air and Campaign Medals and the squadron earned the Fleet Air Wing THREE Battle Efficiency Excellence "E" Award. The Tridents participated in numerous North Atlantic and Mediterranean deployments from 1968 to 1980. VP-26's outstanding performance throughout these extensive operations earned the squadron the Navy Unit Commendation, two CNO Safety Awards, three Meritorious Unit Commendations, the Captain Arnold J. Isbell Trophy for excellence in ASW, and designation as the Navy's only active duty Bicentennial Squadron. In 1979, VP-26 transitioned to the P-3C Update 11. In 1980, the squadron deployed to NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan where the Tridents received the Navy Expeditionary Medal for activities in the Indian Ocean. In May 1981, Patrol Squadron 26 introduced Harpoon Missile Capability to the Mediterranean theater. In the remainder of the 80's, VP-26 deployed to Keflavik, Iceland, Rota, Spain, Lajes, Azores, and various other countries to include England, Turkey, Africa, and the Acsencion Islands. In 1989, the squadron received its second consecutive Battle "E". In November 1990, VP-26 commenced a unique tri-site deployment to NS Roosevelt Roads, PR , and Lajes, Azores performing Detection and Monitoring Operations while several crews and an administrative and maintenance detachment remained in Brunswick, Maine. In November 1992, Patrol Squadron 26 completed a Mediterranean deployment to Sigonelia, Sicily, during which they again forged history. This time they were the first P-3 squadron to fly missions in the Adriatic Sea during Operation Maritime Monitor. VP-26 flew in support of Operation DESERT CALM and UN sanctions against the former Republic of Yugoslavia, earning the Joint Meritorious Unit Award. In February 1994, the squadron completed an historic Mediterranean deployment to Sigonelia, Sicily, highlighted by a P-3 record setting 165 live Maverick missile loads and execution of the first live Maverick missile firing an operational P-3 squadron. The Tridents flew over 4800 hours in support of Operation SHARP GUARD in union with NATO forces in the Adriatic and Mediterranean Seas, in addition to supporting Operation DESERT CALM in the Red Sea and numerous multinational exercises. In October 1994, VP-26 magnificently demonstrated the concept of "fly and train as you would fight" by flawlessly executing a formation Mining Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI). This was the first MRCI flown in close formation by any VP squadron in the previous five years. In November 1994, VP-26 conducted its third Maverick missile shot at the Atlantic Fleet Weapons Test Facility near Puerto Rico. This superb event was conducted during the time the squadron was vigorously preparing for several aircraft transfers and its upcoming Operational Readiness Exam. In December 1994, Team Trident was called upon to conduct a SAR effort 950 miles off the coast of New England. A 450 foot Ukrainian freighter had been taking on water in stormy seas. VP-26 flew over 85 hours in 6 days in support of this effort, during which two people were rescued after their vessel had sunk. In January 1995, only days after their arrival in Sigonella for their third consecutive Mediterranean Maverick deployment, the Tridents received COMPATWING FIVE's nomination for the Patrol Wings Atlantic Battle "E" award. VP-26 flew over 5,000 hours and 300 armed missions in support of operations Sharp Guard and Deny Flight in addition to numerous NATO exercises. In July 1995, the Tridents returned to Brunswick, Maine, to begin and intense seven month transition to the newer P-3C Update III aircraft. This transition was completed in February 1996. In March 1996, the Tridents celebrated a record-breaking 250,000 mishap-free flight hours in 33 years, a milestone achieved by no other operational squadron in the U.S. Navy. VP-26 continued to set records during their most recent tri-site deployment to Iceland, Puerto Rico, and Panama. They had the highest drug interdiction rate ever with more than 1.9 billion dollars in cocaine and marijuana busts. Cocaine busts alone were in excess of 38 metric tons which is equivalent to over 20% of estimated U.S. consumption. The crews in Iceland had the highest total contact time on "real world" submarines of any U.S. MPA squadron in the last four years. They participated in such exercises as NATO CJTFEX NORTHERN LIGHTS/ BRIGHT HORIZON 96, Keftacex 1-96, RN Joint Maritime Course 2-96 (which included 9 nations' MPA), and were the first-ever U.S. military unit invited to participate in Norwegian national exercise FLOTEX 96. The diverse service of Maritime Patrol requires that we perform many specific tasks. In all these tasks, and as VP-26 sharpens its focus on the future, one thing remains constant. Our fundamental mission: "We Hunt" Contributed by George Sherwood GSherwood@compuserve.com WEBSITE: http://shell.ime.net/~georges/index.htm

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Patrol Squadron 26, a member of Patrol Wing FIVE, is a Maritime Patrol Squadron with a worldwide theater of operations. Mission areas include multi-sensor intelligence collection, surface surveillance, over-the-horizon targeting, undersea warfare, mining, drug interdiction, communications relaying, command and control, and search and rescue (SAR). Although the "TRIDENTS" are homeported at U.S. Naval Air Station, Brunswick, Maine, their reputation is known throughout the world. The squadron's history may be traced back to August 26, 1943 when Bombing Squadron 114, flying the PB4Y Liberator, was tasked with convoy protection duty during World War II. In 1948, the designation was changed to Patrol Squadron 26 and the squadron was based in NAS Port Lyautey, French Morocco until 1950. In 1951 the squadron received its second type of aircraft, the P-2V Neptune and subsequently moved from Patuxent River, Maryland to Brunswick, Maine. Some of the highlights in the 1960's include: support of the Quarantine during the Cuban Missile Crisis; transition to the P-3 Orion in 1966; and operations in Southeast Asia where several members earned Air and Campaign Medals and the squadron earned the Fleet Air Wing THREE Battle Efficiency Excellance ("E") Award. The Tridents participated in numerous North Atlantic and Mediterranean deployments from 1968 to 1980. VP-26's outstanding performance throughout these extensive operations earned the squadron the Navy Unit Commendation, two CNO Safety Awards, three Meritorious Unit Commendations, the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy for excellence in ASW, and designation as the Navy's only active duty Bicentennial Squadron. In 1979, VP-26 transitioned to the P-3C Update II. In 1980, the squadron deployed to NAF Kadena, Okinawa, Japan where the Tridents received the Navy Expeditionary Medal for activities in the Indian Ocean. In May 1981, Patrol Squadron 26 introduced Harpoon Missile capability into the Mediterranean theater. In the remainder of the 80's, VP-26 deployed to Keflavik, Rota, Lajes, England, Ascension Island, Sigonella, Turkey and Africa. In 1989, the squadron received its second consecutive Battle "E". In November 1990, VP-26 commenced a unique tri-site deployment to Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, and Lajes, Azores performing Detection and Monitoring Operations while several crews and an administrative and maintenance detachment remained "deployed" to Brunswick, Maine. In November 1992, Patrol Squadron 26 completed a Mediterranean deployment to Sigonella, Sicily, during which they again forged history, this time as the first P-3 squadron to fly missions in the Adriatic Sea during Operation Maritime Monitor. VP-26 flew in support of U.N. sanctions against the former Republic of Yugoslavia and Operation Desert Calm. In February 1994, the squadron completed a historic Mediterranean deployment to Sigonella, Sicily, highlighted by a P-3 record setting 165 live Maverick missiles loads and execution of the first live Maverick missile firing by an operational P-3 squadron. The Tridents flew over 4800 hours in support of Operation Sharp Guard in coalition with NATO forces in the Adriatic and Mediterranean Seas, in addition to supporting Operation Desert Calm in the Red Sea and numerous multinational exercises. In October 1994, VP-26 magnificently demonstrated the concept "fly and train as you would fight" by flawlessly executing a formation Mining Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI). This complex training evolution was the first MRCI flown in close formation by any VP squadron in the last five years. In December 1994, Team Trident was called upon to conduct a SAR effort 950 miles off the coast of New England. The 450 foot Ukrainian freighter, Salvador Allende had been taking on water in stormy seas. VP-26 flew over 85 hours in 6 days in support of this effort, during which two people were rescued after their vessel had sunk. In January 1995, only days after their arrival in Sigonella for their third consecutive Mediterranean Maverick deployment, the Tridents received COMPATWING FIVE's nomination for the Patrol Wings Atlantic Battle "E" award. VP-26 flew over 5,000 hours and 300 armed missions in support of operations Sharp Guard and Deny Flight, and numerous NATO exercises including Dogfish, Sharem 111, Royal Delta, Juniper Falconry, Destined Glory and Dogu Akdeniz. In July 1995, the Tridents returned to Brunswick, ME, to begin an intense seven month transition to the newer model update three aircraft. This transition was completed in February 1996. In March 1996, the Tridents celebrated a record-breaking 250,000 mishap-free flight hours and 33 years, a milestone achieved by no other operational squadron in the US Navy." http://flightdeck.airlant.navy.mil/public/chvp26.htm

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...VP-26 History 1940 - 2004...MISSION: Patrol Squadron TWENTY-SIX is a diverse element of the United States Navy that performs many assignments. We are the hunters who serve as the eyes and ears of the Fleet. By patrolling in advance of the Fleet's arrival or in its surrounding environment, potential enemies are located, tracked and if necessary, neutralized. Maritime patrol aircraft also serve as a strategic deterrent to conflicts. Team TRIDENT will hunt at great distances and with long endurance, often from remote sites with little support..." WebSite: VP-26 Official Site http://www.vp26.navy.mil/ [06MAR2008]
    Get Adobe Reader
    Open VP History Adobe FileVP-26 History Circa 1940 - 2004 690KB


    Circa 1942-1945

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-5 - History of Headquarters Squadron Fleet Air Wing Five - 01SEP42 through 01JAN45. Squadron's Assigned: VP-15, VP-16, VP-17, VP-18, VP-21, VP-22, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, VP-28, VP-31, VP-52, VP-63, VP-81, VP-92, VP-94, VPB-105, VPB-107, VPB-110, VPB-111, VPB-112, VPB-113, VPB-114, VPB-126, VPB-134, VPB-147, VPB-149, VP-201, VP-205, VP-208, VP-209, VP-210, VP-211, VP-212, VP-213, VP-214, VP-215 and VP-216 - Submitted Feburary 1, 1945..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [27NOV2012]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
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    Circa 1941-1944

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...History of FAW-8 - History from 08JUL41-31DEC44 Submitted April 12th, 1945. Squadron's Assigned: VP-16, VP-18, VP-19, VP-20, VP-21, VP-22, VP-25, VP-26, VP-27, VP-28, VP-43, VP-61, VP-62, VP-63, VP-72, VP-81, VP-82, VP-83, VP-84, VP-92, VP-118, VP-123, VP-133, VP-137, VP-140, VP-142, VP-144, VP-148, VP-150, VP-153, VP-198, VP-205, VP-208 and VP-216..." Official U. S. Navy Records (National Archives and Records Administration) via Fold3 http://www.fold3.com/ [01DEC2012]

    History - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge ThumbnailHistory - Tap To Enlarge Thumbnail
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    Circa 1940

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Why no mention of original VP-26 which was part of Patrol Wing TWO at Pearl and which went to Subic (Olongapo) in fall of 1940 and became second squadron (VP-102) of Patrol Wing TEN. VP-21 had come out year earlier and became VP-101 at Cavite. LT J. J. Hyland, USN, was Engineer Officer of VP-102. As Admiral, USN, and either CINCPAC or COM7thFLT he flew last flying boat war patrol in Viet-Nam. Deceased 25 Oct 1998. Both top notch pilot (he served 18 months as Admiral E. J. King's pilot during WWII and if he hadn't been good wouldn't have lasted a week) and fine officer - he was first OIC of USN detachment at Geraldton, Australia (north of Freemantle) in 1942 and my brother (AOM1c at the time) remembers him with respect and admiration..." Contributed by Allan LeBaron alebaron@HiWAAY.net [24JAN99]

    HistoryA BIT OF HISTORY: "...Circa 1940 AIRCRAFT SCOUTING FORCE - Rear Admiral Arthur L. Bristol - HULBERT (AVD-6) - LCDR J. V. Carney..." Contributed by John Lucas john.lucas@netzero.net [15DEC98]

    PATROL WING ONE - CDR W. K. Harrill

    TENDERS

    USS HULBERT (AVD-6) - LCDR J. V. Carney
    USS PELICAN (AVP-6) - LT H. J. Dyson
    USS AVOCET (AVP-4) - LT R. E. Dixon

    SQUADRONS

    VP-11 - LCDR J. W. Harris
    VP-12 - LCDR C. W. Oexle
    VP-13 - LCDR S. B. Cooke
    VP-14 - LCDR W. T. Rassieur

    PATROL WING TWO - CAPTAIN Patrick N. L. Bellinger

    TENDERS

    USS WRIGHT (AV-1) - CDR J. M. Shoemaker,
    USS WILLIAM B. PRESTON (AVD-7) - LCDR F. J. Bridget
    USS SWAN (AVP-7) - and LT A. R. Truslow, Jr.

    SQUADRONS

    VP-22 - LCDR W. P. Cogswell
    VP-23 - LCDR G. Van Deurs
    VP-24 - LCDR D. C. Allen
    VP-25 - LCDR A. R. Brady
    VP-26 - LCDR A. N. Perkins


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